garbanzopalooza

A blog by ordinary people about living an extraordinary life

What is this leafy green vegetable in our CSA basket?

One of the best things about belonging to the CSA this fall is that we are able to try new vegetables that we would not even think to purchase on our own.  This past week, a leafy green vegetable was in our CSA, and we had no idea what it was.  Thankfully, Farmer Dave has a produce ID guide (http://www.farmerdaves.net/media/produce-id-guide) and we were able to identify our mystery guest as tatsoi.
What exactly is tatsoi?  Tatsoi is an asian green, that is in the same family as broccoli, Brussels sprouts, kale and collard greens.  It is high in minerals and antioxidants.  It is also a hearty plant, as I found many references saying it can be harvested even when covered in snow!  It is recommended that you store your tatsoi in a plastic bag, in your crisper drawer for 3-5 days.  You can peel of stalks when they start to look dry or wilted.

We used the tatsoi in a miso soup, which was very quick to put together.  We served the soup with a  filet of haddock that we simply seasoned with salt and pepper and cooked in a sauté pan.  The fish can be flaked and added into the soup.

Ingredients

  • 1 small onion, thinly sliced
  • 1 carrot, grated
  • 4 cups of vegetable stock
  • 12-16 tatsoi leaves, chopped
  • 1 packed of instant miso soup

Saute the onion and the carrot in a stockpot.  Add the vegetable stock and tatsoi leaves, bring to a boil.  Turn down to a simmer, add the miso soup mix and cook for 3-5 minutes.

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This entry was posted on November 20, 2011 by in Peter Waterman's posts.
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